A brown hat with the text "LDH consulting services" next to it.

Tip of the Hat

21 November 2019

Gone Phishin'


Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

Our Executive Assistant has been waiting for the opportunity to spend some of her summer days fishing at one of Seattle’s many fishing spots. LDH, unfortunately, cannot claim that fishing is a work-related activity; however, dealing with the different types of "phishing" activities do fall under the realm of keeping data private and safe.

Phishing, like fishing, is a complex process, most of which is done behind the scenes. The general goal of email phishing is to gain a piece of sensitive information or system access from the target. To achieve that goal, the phishing email needs to pull off certain steps, the first being to appear official. This doesn’t work very well if you have encountered a phishing email for a company that you don’t do business with, but an email that is designed to look exactly like an official email from a company that you do business with (or even work for) can lead to a false sense of security.

Phishing relies heavily on exploiting human traits and biases. Having an email look authentic is one way. Even if the email doesn’t look authentic, if it tells you that your account has been compromised, or if you have won an award, you might not think twice before acting on the email. For example, if someone claiming to be from your IT department asks for your password because they need to access your computer to perform critical security updates, your initial reaction is to be helpful and to provide the information. If a bank email told you that your account has been suspended, you might not be thinking about if the email was legitimate – you might be thinking about bills that are set up to auto-pay with the account, and that you need to make sure all those payments go through. You click on the link and become another fish caught by the phisher.

Avoiding phishing attempts involves several tactics. The best way of dealing with phishing emails is to never have them pop into your inbox in the first place. Junk and spam filters can do most of the work, along with specialized applications and software. When you do get an email from a company that you do business with, the best first step to take is to stop and think before acting on the email’s requests:
  • Check the links - Some phishing attempts will come from a domain name similar to the actual company, but something just doesn’t quite fit. For example, the link companyA.examplesite.com might make you think that it’s a legitimate Company A URL – in reality, the main site is examplesite.com.
  • Check the sender field – If you are getting an email claiming to be from Company A, but the sender’s email address is not from Company A, the email is most likely not from Company A.
  • Check the message – does the message include any of the following?
    • Misspellings, bad grammar, poor formatting?
    • Messages claiming that your account was suspended or compromised and that you need to download a file, click a link, or send your login credentials via email to resolve the issue?
    • Messages claiming that you won a prize or award and that you need to click on a link or send over information to claim the prize?
    • If the email writer who is requesting your login information claims to come from your organization or from IT?
If you go through the checks and are still not 100% sure if the email is legitimate, do not click on any links, download or open any attachments, or reply back to the email. Contact the company through other means – opening a browser tab and accessing the company website via bookmarked tab or typing in the main company URL (NOT from the email!) is a safer way to obtain contact information as well as logging into your account.

Phishing has gotten more elaborate throughout the years, finding new ways to exploit human characteristics. Spear phishing and whaling are just two of the ways phishing has evolved. Nonetheless, if we all stop and think before we act on that email telling us to send over our information to claim our free fishing trip, more phishers will end their phishing trips with no catches.

Have a question or topic that you want us to write about? Email us at newsletter@ldhconsultingservices.com!