A brown hat with the text "LDH consulting services" next to it.

Tip of the Hat

21 November 2019

Silent Librarian and Tracking Report Cards


Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat! We at LDH survived the full moon on the Friday the 13th, though our Executive Assistant failed to bring donuts into the office to ward off bad luck. Unfortunately, several universities need more than luck against a widespread cyberattack that has a connection to libraries.

This attack, called Cobalt Dickens or Silent Librarian, relies on phishing to gain access to university systems. The potential victims receive a spoofed email from the library stating that their library account is expired, followed by instructions to click on a link to reactivate the account by entering their account information on a spoofed library website. With this attack happening at the beginning of many universities’ semesters, incoming students and faculty might click through without giving a second thought to the email.

We are used to having banking and other commercial sites be the subject of spoofing by attackers to obtain user credentials. Nonetheless, Silent Librarian reminds us that libraries are not exempt from being spoofed. Silent Librarian is also a good prompt to review incident response policies and procedures surrounding patron data leaks or breaches with your staff. Periodic reviews will help ensure that policies and procedures reflect the changing threats and risks with the changing technology environment. Reviews can also be a good time to review incident response materials and training for library staff, as well as reviewing cybersecurity basics. If a patron calls into the library about an email regarding their expired account, a trained staff member has a better chance in preventing that patron falling for the phishing email which then better protects library systems from being accessed by attackers.

We move from phishing to tracking with the release of a new public tool to assess privacy on library websites. The library directory on Marshall Breeding’s Library Technology Guides site is a valuable resource, listing thousands of libraries in the world. Each listing has basic library information, including information about the types of systems used by the library, including specific products such as the integrated library system, digital repository, and discovery layer. Each listing now includes a Privacy and Security Report Card that grades the main library website on the following factors:
  • HTTPS use
  • Redirection to an encrypted version of the web page
  • Use of Google Analytics, including if the site is instructing GA to anonymize data from the site
  • Use of Google Tag Manager, DoubleClick, and other trackers from Google
  • Use of Facebook trackers
  • Use of other third-party services and trackers, such as Crazy Egg and NewRelic
You can check what your library’s card looks like by clicking on the Privacy and Security Report button on the individual library page listing. In addition to individual statistics, you can view the aggregated statistics at https://bit.ly/ltg-https-report. The majority of public library websites are HTTPS, which is good news! The number of public libraries using Google Analytics to collect non-anonymized data, however, is not so good news. If you are one of those libraries, here are a couple of resources to help you get started in addressing this potential privacy risk for your patrons:
Have a question or topic that you want us to write about? Email us at newsletter@ldhconsultingservices.com!