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Tip of the Hat

27 September 2020

A New Privacy Framework For You

Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently published version 1.0 of their Privacy Framework. The purpose of the framework is to create a holistic approach to manage privacy risks in an organization. The Framework is different from other standards in such that the goal is not full compliance with the Framework. Instead, the Framework encourages organizations to design a privacy program that best meets the current realities and needs of the organization and key stakeholders, such as customers.

The Framework structure is split into three parts:
  • The Core is the activities and outcomes for protecting privacy in an organization. These are broken down by Function, Category, and Subcategory. For example:
    • Identify-P (the P is there to differentiate from NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework) is a Function in which the organization is developing an organizational awareness of privacy risks in their data processing practices.
    • A Category of the Identify-P Function is Inventory and Mapping, which is taking stock of various systems and processes.
    • The Subcategories of the Category are what you would expect from a data inventory: what data is being collected where, when, how, by who, and why.
  • The Profile plays two roles – it can represent the current privacy practices of an organization, as well as a target set of practices for which the organization can aim for. A Current Profile lists the current Functions, Categories, and Subcategories the organization is currently doing to manage privacy risks. The Target Profile helps businesses figure out what Functions, Categories, and Subcategories should be in place to best protect privacy and to mitigate privacy risk.
  • The Implementation Tiers are a measurement of how the organization is doing in terms of managing privacy risk. There are four Tiers in total, ranging from minimal to proactive privacy risk management. Organizations can use their Current Profile to determine which Tier describes their current operations. Target Profiles can be developed with the desired Tier in mind.
Why should libraries care about this framework? Libraries, like other organizations, have a variety of risks to manage as part of their daily operations. Privacy risks come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from collecting more data than operationally necessary and not restricting sharing of patron data with vendors to lack of clear communications with staff about privacy-related policies and procedures. Some organizations deal with privacy risks through privacy risk assessments (or privacy impact assessments). The drawback is that the assessments are best suited for focusing on specific parts of an organization and not the organization itself.

The Privacy Framework provides a way for organizations to manage privacy risks on an organizational level. The Framework takes the same approach to privacy as Privacy by Design (PbD) by making privacy a part of the entire process or project. The Framework can be integrated into existing organizations, which is by design – one of the criticisms of PbD is the complications of trying to implement it in existing projects and processes. The flexibility of the Framework can mean that different types of libraries – school, academic, public, and special – can create Profiles that both address the realities of their organization as well as creating Target Profiles that incorporate standards and regulations specific for their library. School libraries can address the risks and needs surrounding student library data as presented in FERPA, while public libraries can identify and mitigate privacy risks facing different patron groups in their community. The Framework also allows for the creation of Subcategories to cover any gaps specific to an industry or organization not covered by the existing Framework, which gives libraries added flexibility to address library industry-specific needs and risks.

The flexibility of the Framework is a strength for organizations looking for a customized approach to organizational privacy risk management. This same flexibility can also be a drawback for libraries looking for a more structured approach. The Framework incorporates other NIST standards and frameworks, which can help ease apprehension of those looking for more structure. Nonetheless, libraries that want to explore risk management and incorporate privacy into their organization should give NIST Privacy Framework some consideration.
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