A brown hat with the text "LDH consulting services" next to it.

Tip of the Hat

22 November 2019

What’s The Name of Your Pet?


Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

Our Executive Assistant argues that we at LDH shouldn’t use her name to answer the question in today's newsletter title. She is, after all, our Executive Assistant, and not a pet. However, the EA’s objection also has merit for information security reasons. Today we visit our information security neighbors to explore one risk to library staff and patron account privacy – the dreaded security question.

Where did you meet your best friend?

This topic was inspired by a recent popular tweet:



Common security questions can be easily cracked by a quick search of your online activity. Social media is a gold mine of this type of information, including information about pets, childhood, school, family, or even your favorite color and sports team. Some companies provide less common security questions that would prove harder to crack, though most companies do not stray from the common security questions.

Library staff are in a particular bind in a couple of situations involving security questions. Some vendor products require security questions for account creation, and some libraries are only allowed one institutional “admin” account to share among staff. We bet you a nice cup of quality tea that at least one of the security question answers for that account is a variation of the following words:
  • Checkout or check-in
  • Dewey
  • Books, including bookworm
  • Cat
  • Reading
  • Library
  • Your library’s, organization’s, or department’s name, physical location, mascot, school colors, etc.
Perhaps the person who created the account decided to use their own personal information to answer the questions, which doesn’t get changed when that staff person leaves the library. Resetting the account now becomes trickier, particularly if this staff personal information wasn’t documented. However, if that person posted some of the information on a public site, that staff account is now at a higher risk of being compromised by a threat actor, looking for a way to get into the system.

In either case, library staff accounts that require security questions provide unique security challenges that also carry some privacy risks for both staff and patrons.

What is your favorite color?

By now you’ve heard the advice to not post private information publicly from InfoSec. That doesn’t help much when you have a shared account for library staff. Ideally, you shouldn't have shared accounts – application permissions and privileges should be granted to individual user accounts. These user-level permissions and privileges should change anytime there is a change in staff or staff responsibilities. Some vendors allow for such user permission granularity, and if your vendor doesn't support that level of permission control, start asking them to do so!

There is also the fact that security questions themselves are inherently insecure as a way to keep user accounts secure; however, many companies still rely on these questions to authenticate users or for password resets. If you are creating a library staff account for a vendor product or service, and the vendor is requiring you to answer common security questions as part of the account creation process, a good place to start is to randomize your answers.

When we say “randomize” we do not mean swapping out your personal information for information about your workplace but provide an answer that would make no sense in answering the question. For example, “What was your first car?” could have the following answers:
  • A: Treehouse
    • A single word or a simple phrase that is not apparently related to you, the organization, or the question itself
  • A: ur0wIBHRGp9IBi
    • A random string of characters generated from a password generator
  • A: decimallemonBritish
    • A random passphrase generated from a passphrase generator
The more random you get with your answer, the better. To ensure that you are getting closer to a random answer, use a password or passphrase generator. Most password managers have random generators, and some even have the option to create passphrases. If you have multiple accounts that require security question answers, do not use the same answer twice; instead, generate new answers for each account, even if the account shares the same questions with other accounts.

Lastly, document the answers in a secure place. Many password managers have a secure notes function in which you can document your security answers for each account. Make sure that the place you store your answers is encrypted and accessible to only those who need access to those answers in the case that they need to reset the password or access the account. In most cases, that would mean only you, but if your department uses a password manager to manage department accounts, this would be the place to store them as well.

As long as companies require you to answer security questions, you need to mitigate the many risks that come with such questions. Randomizing answers is the first place to start, and not using personal information attached to any staff members or the workplace is another critical step. If all else fails, you can always change your pet’s name to 9AtTsCbWqRww7C…
Have a question or topic that you want us to write about? Email us at newsletter@ldhconsultingservices.com!