Just Published! Library Data Risk Assessment Guide

Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

To build or to outsource?

Building an application or creating a process in a library takes time and resources. A major benefit of keeping it local, though, is that libraries have the greatest control over the data collected, stored, and processed by that application or system. Conversely, a major drawback of keeping it local is the sheer number of moving parts to keep track of in the building process. Some libraries have the technical know-how to build their own applications or have the resources to keep a process in house. Keeping track of privacy risks is another matter. Risk assessment and management must be addressed in any system or process that touches patron data, so how can libraries with limited privacy risk assessment or management experience make sure that their local systems and processes mitigate patron privacy risks?

Libraries have a new resource to help with privacy risk management! The Digital Library Federation’s Privacy and Ethics in Technology Working Group (formerly known as the Technologies of Surveillance Working Group) published “A Practical Guide to Performing a Library User Data Risk Assessment in Library-Built Systems“. This 28-page guide provides best practices and practical strategies in conducting a data risk assessment, including:

  • Classifications of library user data and privacy risk
  • A table of common risk areas, including probability, severity, and mitigation strategies
  • Practical steps to mitigate data privacy risks in the library, ranging from policy to data minimization
  • A template for readers to conduct their own user data inventory and risk assessment

This guide joins the other valuable resources produced by the DLF Privacy and Ethics in Technology Working Group:

The group also plans to publish a set of guidelines around vendor privacy in the coming months, so be sure to bookmark https://wiki.diglib.org/Privacy_and_Ethics_in_Technology and check back for any updates!

A New Privacy Framework For You

Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

The National Institute of Standards and Technology recently published version 1.0 of their Privacy Framework. The purpose of the framework is to create a holistic approach to manage privacy risks in an organization. The Framework is different from other standards in such that the goal is not full compliance with the Framework. Instead, the Framework encourages organizations to design a privacy program that best meets the current realities and needs of the organization and key stakeholders, such as customers.

The Framework structure is split into three parts:

  • The Core is the activities and outcomes for protecting privacy in an organization. These are broken down by Function, Category, and Subcategory. For example:
    • Identify-P (the P is there to differentiate from NIST’s Cybersecurity Framework) is a Function in which the organization is developing an organizational awareness of privacy risks in their data processing practices.
    • A Category of the Identify-P Function is Inventory and Mapping, which is taking stock of various systems and processes.
    • The Subcategories of the Category are what you would expect from a data inventory: what data is being collected where, when, how, by who, and why.
  • The Profile plays two roles – it can represent the current privacy practices of an organization, as well as a target set of practices for which the organization can aim for. A Current Profile lists the current Functions, Categories, and Subcategories the organization is currently doing to manage privacy risks. The Target Profile helps businesses figure out what Functions, Categories, and Subcategories should be in place to best protect privacy and to mitigate privacy risk.
  • The Implementation Tiers are a measurement of how the organization is doing in terms of managing privacy risk. There are four Tiers in total, ranging from minimal to proactive privacy risk management. Organizations can use their Current Profile to determine which Tier describes their current operations. Target Profiles can be developed with the desired Tier in mind.

Why should libraries care about this framework? Libraries, like other organizations, have a variety of risks to manage as part of their daily operations. Privacy risks come in a variety of shapes and sizes, from collecting more data than operationally necessary and not restricting sharing of patron data with vendors to lack of clear communications with staff about privacy-related policies and procedures. Some organizations deal with privacy risks through privacy risk assessments (or privacy impact assessments). The drawback is that the assessments are best suited for focusing on specific parts of an organization and not the organization itself.

The Privacy Framework provides a way for organizations to manage privacy risks on an organizational level. The Framework takes the same approach to privacy as Privacy by Design (PbD) by making privacy a part of the entire process or project. The Framework can be integrated into existing organizations, which is by design – one of the criticisms of PbD is the complications of trying to implement it in existing projects and processes. The flexibility of the Framework can mean that different types of libraries – school, academic, public, and special – can create Profiles that both address the realities of their organization as well as creating Target Profiles that incorporate standards and regulations specific for their library. School libraries can address the risks and needs surrounding student library data as presented in FERPA, while public libraries can identify and mitigate privacy risks facing different patron groups in their community. The Framework also allows for the creation of Subcategories to cover any gaps specific to an industry or organization not covered by the existing Framework, which gives libraries added flexibility to address library industry-specific needs and risks.

The flexibility of the Framework is a strength for organizations looking for a customized approach to organizational privacy risk management. This same flexibility can also be a drawback for libraries looking for a more structured approach. The Framework incorporates other NIST standards and frameworks, which can help ease apprehension of those looking for more structure. Nonetheless, libraries that want to explore risk management and incorporate privacy into their organization should give NIST Privacy Framework some consideration.

Threat, Vulnerability, or Risk?

Welcome to this week’s Tip of the Hat!

“Animal, plant, or mineral?” Most folks can, with a healthy amount of confidence, say that something is one of those three, as well as explain the differences between the three categories. It’s also a fun game to keep younger kids occupied for your next long trip.

Today we are going to introduce a variation of the game for us adults – “Threat, vulnerability, or risk?” Information privacy and security use these three terms with assessing the protection of data and other organizational assets, as well as potential harms to those assets and the organization. Many people use these terms interchangeably in daily conversations surrounding Infosec and privacy. There are differences between the three, though! To understand what it means when someone says “threat” instead of “vulnerability”, we will go over some definitions to help you differentiate between the three terms:

A Threat is a potential scenario that can cause damage or loss to an organizational asset. You might have heard the term threat actor, which refers to a specific someone or something that could be responsible for creating said harm to the organization. Note well that you do not have to demonstrate malicious intent to be a threat actor. Sometimes threat actors do not act out of malicious intent but are still a threat due to them exploiting a vulnerability in the organization.

Vulnerability refers to the weakness in any system or structure that a threat can use to cause harm to the organization. People focus on technical vulnerabilities; however, the non-technical vulnerabilities, aka your fellow humans and organizational structures, are as important to identify as your technical vulnerabilities.

Risk is the potential of damage or loss resulting from a threat taking advantage of a vulnerability. Many use an equation to calculate the amount of risk of a particular scenario: Risk = Threat x Vulnerability x Cost, with Cost being the potential impact on the target by a threat.

Let’s explore these terms further with our library hat on:

What can be considered a threat?

  • Untrained/undertrained staff not following law enforcement request procedures
  • A staff member gains unauthorized access to sensitive systems or data, and modifies, exports, or deletes data to inflict harm or for their gain
  • A data breach of a vendor-hosted database

What can be considered a vulnerability?

  • Lack of access to regular privacy training and resources for staff
  • Lax or lack of system user access policies and procedures
  • Lack of or insufficient vendor privacy and security practices
    Improper collection and storage of sensitive data by systems

What are the possible types of risk in any given scenario?

  • Legal – possible legal action due to noncompliance with applicable local, state, federal, or international regulations surrounding particular types of data
  • Reputational – “The Court of Public Opinion”; loss of patron trust; loss of trust in the vendor
  • Operational – the inability to perform critical tasks and duties to ensure uninterrupted access to core services and resources

By knowing the differences between threat, vulnerability, and risk, you can better assess the scenarios that can put your organization at higher risk of legal, reputational, or operational harm. You can also proactively mitigate these risks by addressing the vulnerabilities that can be exploited by the threats you can identify. Take some time this week to walk through the “Threat, vulnerability, or risk?” game with your colleagues, and you might be surprised by what you will find about your organization.